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A Sample Works Cited Page

Below are sample entries for all the most common types of sources, in this order:  for a book, for a newspaper article, for an article in an anthology, for an edition of an anthology (this is your sample primary source entry!), for a website, and for a journal article, which everyone must have one of.  Then at the bottom is a review of the basic formatting rules, which are also covered in the MLA Citation of Research link.  You should print this out and refer to it constantly while building your Works Cited page for your research paper! 

First comes the title, as you see below:

Works Cited

Aronson, Linda, Roger Katz, and Candide Moustafa.  The Fiction of William Faulkner.  New York:  Harper, 1982. 

Above is a typical entry for a secondary source that is a book.  The items, in the order you see them, are author’s name, title, place of publication, publisher, and copyright date.  The entry is the same whether the book has one author or several, so long as the book was written collaboratively, as opposed to being an anthology containing articles by different authors.

Baranski, Vida H.  “Errors in Evaluating Faulkner’s Legacy.”  Boston Times 15 Jan. 1997, sec. B:3. 

Above is a typical entry for a newspaper article.  The items are author, article title, name of newspaper, date, section and page number.

Bowman, Joel P.  “The Grierson Clan in Faulkner.”  Perspectives on William Faulkner’s Characters.  Ed. Al Williams.  New Haven:  Yale UP, 1994.  162-95. 

Above is an entry for an article in an anthology.  Note that it is presented as a smaller work within a larger work.  The items are author, title of article, title of the anthology itself, editor’s name, place of publication, publisher, copyright date, and beginning/ending page numbers.

Faulkner, William.  “A Rose for Emily.”  Literature:  An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing.  Eleventh edition.  Ed. X. J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia.  New York:  Pearson Longman, 2010.  29-36. 

This above is also a work within an anthology, but with the edition number included, if a work exists in more than one edition.  Most entries for works from textbooks will look like this.  The items, in order, are author’s name, title of the work within the textbook, title of the textbook itself, edition number, editors’ names, place of publication, publisher, date of publication, and starting/ending page numbers of the work you are citingNOTE that this entry is your model for your short story (primary source) entry!  All you need to change are the author’s name, story’s title, and page numbers!

Foote, Horton.  To Kill a Mockingbird.  In To Kill a Mockingbird, Tender Mercies, and The Trip to Bountiful:  Three Screenplays.  Horton Foote.  New York:  Grove Press, 1989.  1-80.

This above entry is for the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird.  The type entry is a slightly modified version of a work in an anthology.  Note that almost certainly, the entry as you type it into a Word file will need to be reverse indented because it will not fit on one line as it does here.

A Hypertext Study of Faulkner’s Symbolism.  10 Dec. 1995.  Web.  6 Jan. 2009 <http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/1pb/faulknersymbolism.html> .  

Above is an entry for a website.  The items (normally) are author, title of the website, date last modified (often not shown; if not, type “n.d.”), date you accessed the site, and website URL (must be letter-perfect).  In this entry, there is no author, either an individual or an organization, so the entry begins with the title.  Note also that the word “A” is ignored while alphabetizing.

White, Joan R.  “Conflict and Characterization in ‘A Rose for Emily’.”  Fiction Studies 51.1 (Spring 1987):  3-24.

Above is a typical entry for an article in a professional journal (magazine) when you have access to the actual  printed version.  See below for two different entries for online versions.  The items, in order, are author, title of article (notice the title-within-the-title, and the single quotation marks within the outer, double marks), title of the journal (in italics), volume and issue numbers, date, and beginning/ending page numbersNOTE that everyone must have a journal article source, and this is your model for that.  Be very careful not to omit both volume/issue numbers and issue date.  That is a common mistake, and a costly one.  You must tell your reader which issue.

White, Joan R.  “Conflict and Characterization in ‘A Rose for Emily’.”  Fiction Studies 51.1 (Spring 1987):  3-24.  MLA International Bibliography.  Web.  1 Nov. 2010.

Above is a typical entry for an article in a professional journal (magazine) when you access the article as a PDF file in Full Text, via the database on your computer.  See below for an HTML online version.  The items, in order, are author, title of article (notice the title-within-the-title, and the single quotation marks within the outer, double marks), title of the journal (in italics), volume and issue numbers, date, and beginning/ending page numbers.  The three added items which you do not see in the first (print) version above, are title of the database (in italics), the indicator that this is a Web source, and the date you accessed it.  NOTE that this is an alternative entry for the required journal article secondary source..  Be very careful not to omit both volume/issue numbers and issue date, just as with the print version.  That is a common mistake, and a costly one.  You must tell your reader which issue.  Note regarding parenthetical citations from a PDF file:  Because PDF files provide page numbers just as the print version does, your parenthetical citations from a PDF file-type source must tell the page number of the quote.

White, Joan R.  “Conflict and Characterization in ‘A Rose for Emily’.”  Fiction Studies 51.1 (Spring 1987):  n. pag.  MLA International Bibliography.  Web.  1 Nov. 2010.

Above is a typical entry for an article in a professional journal (magazine) when you access the article as an HTML file in Full Text, via the database on your computer.  The items, in order, are author, title of article (notice the title-within-the-title, and the single quotation marks within the outer, double marks), title of the journal (in italics), volume and issue numbers, date, and beginning/ending page numbers.  The three added items which you do not see in the first (print) version above, are title of the database (in italics), the indicator that this is a Web source, and the date you accessed it.  NOTE that this is an alternative entry for the required journal article secondary source..  Be very careful not to omit volume/issue numbers and issue date, just as with the print version.  That is a common mistake, and a costly one.  You must tell your reader which issue.  Note regarding parenthetical citations from a PDF file:  Unlike PDF files, which provide page numbers just as the print version does, your parenthetical citations from an HTML file-type source will not tell the page number of the quote, because HTML files do not show page numbers.  This is signified by the "n. pag." item, which you see above in place of starting and ending page numbers.  It means "no pagination."

FORMATTING OF THE WORKS CITED PAGE:

1.      Double-space every line.  Just go to Format, go to Paragraph, go to Line Spacing, set it on Double, hit okay, and then let the computer do the spacing.

2.      Alphabetize all entries, by first word.  The exception is like the website entry above:  If the first word is ‘a’ or ‘an’ or ‘the’ then you alphabetize by the second word (but don’t delete the ‘a’ or ‘the’).

3.      Reverse indent each entry.  You do this by playing with the lower two symbols in the numbered rule above your screen.  On my version of MS Word, those are a kind of triangle, point-up, on top of a square.  With your cursor at the beginning of the second line in an entry, click and drag them a ways to the right.  If you are a web student, for a visual graphic of this instruction, go to Course Documents within Blackboard.  On-campus students can ask to see this in my office if need be.

4.  Place the Works Cited on a separate page.  For electronic submissions, insert a page break before it.

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